For Children2023-10-12T07:48:57-05:00

For Children

When Should You Begin?

You might be aware that there’s no expiry date to start orthodontic procedures. But did you ever consider that starting earlier might be more advantageous for youngsters? As per guidelines from the American Association of Orthodontists, it’s recommended that children get their first orthodontic check-up by age 7.

Why is an early check crucial? There are numerous benefits that children can reap from an early orthodontic assessment. However, it’s vital to understand that an early check-up doesn’t always translate to immediate treatment.

In numerous situations, if there’s a need for orthodontic care, we’d just keep an eye on your child’s growth trends until the right time for the treatment.

This approach ensures optimal results efficiently, while also preempting future complications.

As per guidelines from the American Association of Orthodontists, it’s recommended that children get their first orthodontic check-up by age 7

Every Child Grows Differently

Typically, by age six, most children will have their first adult molars coming through. This stage allows for an assessment of teeth alignment, both horizontally and vertically.

It also gives an idea about the available space for the rest of the permanent teeth, and if space seems scarce, it’s the time to intervene.

Why Earlier Treatment Can Be Preferable

Standard treatments for orthodontic issues usually kick off between ages 9-14, aligning with the shedding of all baby teeth and the emergence of many permanent ones. However, some conditions are best addressed earlier, leveraging the child’s active natural growth.

Addressing Harmful Habits

Everyone might indulge in a bad habit now and then. But certain detrimental habits in youngsters can impact the development of their teeth, jaws, and overall oral health. Common examples include persistent thumb sucking, tongue thrusting, and consistent mouth breathing.

The sucking reflex, though natural in toddlers, should fade by ages 2 to 4. If it lingers, it can affect the alignment of the front teeth and jaw shape due to the constant pressure.

The sucking reflex, though natural in toddlers, should fade by ages 2 to 4.

The Impacts of Thumb Sucking

Continued thumb sucking can result in an orthodontic issue known as “open bite”, which could interfere with speech. The same condition can be induced by the tongue consistently pushing against the teeth.

Mouth breathing, a pattern where air is inhaled directly through the mouth, might change the muscular functions of the face and tongue. This can lead to abnormal growth of the jaws and ensuing orthodontic challenges. Although some may start mouth breathing due to a physical problem, it can quickly become a tough-to-break habit.

For all these reasons, orthodontic solutions are available to address these habits early on. It emphasizes the importance of early orthodontic screening for children.

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